IAS HIV Integration Research Prizes – Annual prizes

The IAS HIV Integration Research Prizes will be awarded for the first time at the 23rd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2020) in San Francisco and Oakland, US in July 2020. These awards are intended to generate interest and stimulate interdisciplinary research on basic, clinical, operational and advocacy topics at the intersection of prevention, care and treatment of HIV and other health conditions.

The US$2,000 IAS HIV Integration Research Prizes are awarded by the International AIDS Society HIV Co-Infections and Co-Morbidities initiative. They are incentives for researchers to investigate pertinent research questions that affect people living with HIV from a holistic care point of view. The areas include TB/HIV, hepatitis/HIV and other co-infections; sexually transmitted infections; non-communicable diseases; mental health; ageing; and HIV responses in the context of people who inject drugs and other vulnerable populations such as displaced people, prisoners and sex workers.

The prizes will be awarded to a limited number of top-scoring abstracts in any of these areas. Eligible candidates are presenting authors of abstracts submitted to AIDS 2020 that meet the following criteria:

  • The Scientific Programme Committee has accepted the abstract as an oral presentation, for a poster discussion session or for the poster exhibition.
  • The research demonstrates innovation, originality, rationale and quality.
  • The title or abstract body contains at least one of the following keywords: “tuberculosis”, “hepatitis”, “mental health”, “non-communicable diseases”, “ageing”, “service integration”, “dependence”, “harm reduction”, “drug policy”, “cancer”, “cardiovascular”, “diabetes”.
  • The research presented in the abstract is interdisciplinary and considers basic, clinical, operational, service integration or advocacy topics that are crucial for an integrated and holistic approach to prevention, care or treatment of HIV-related conditions.

Abstract submitters do not need to apply for the prize. All abstracts that meet the criteria will be automatically considered.

CIPHER Grant Programme – Annual programme

The CIPHER Grant Programme provides a unique opportunity for early-stage investigators to address research gaps in paediatric and adolescent HIV in resource-limited settings, in order to promote evidence-based HIV policies and programmes in these settings. The grants are for up to US$150,000 for two years and 80% of grants awarded go to applicants from low- and middle-income countries. The Collaborative Initative for Paediatric HIV Education and Research (CIPHER) is an initiative of the International AIDS Society; this programme is made possible through support from CIPHER Founding Sponsor ViiV Healthcare and Janssen.

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CIPHER Growing the Leaders of Tomorrow Fellowship Programme – Biennial programme

The CIPHER Growing the Leaders of Tomorrow Fellowship Programme contributes to strengthened HIV clinical research capacity in high-burden countries in sub-Saharan Africa by providing two-year research fellowships to emerging young leaders in paediatric HIV clinical science. The fellowship provides up to US$70,000 for the fellow to work with an established mentor on a funded research project that addresses a key gap in paediatric and adolescent HIV clinical science. The Collaborative Initiative for Paediatric HIV Education and Research (CIPHER) is an initiative of the International AIDS Society; this programme is made possible through support from CIPHER Founding Sponsor ViiV Healthcare.

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IAS/Abivax Research-for-Cure Academy Fellowship Prize – Annual prize

The IAS Research-for-Cure Academy provides training on state-of-the-art HIV cure research to talented investigators and clinical scientists interested in advancing the HIV cure field in resource-constrained settings. This US$2,000 annual prize is presented to one outstanding fellow based on their engagement during the academy, collaborative spirit during the project work and continued engagement in the HIV cure field.

Previous prize winners

See the list of winners from previous years.

IAS 2019
Natalia Laufer, Argentina, for her active engagement and valuable input to the collaborative research projects at the Research-for-Cure Academy. Natalia works as a as a physician, basic/clinical researcher, teacher and as a member of a community outreach programme.

AIDS 2018
Paradise Madlala, South Africa, for his active engagement and valuable input to the collaborative research projects at the Research-for-Cure Academy.

IAS President’s Award – Biennial award

The IAS President’s Award aims to recognize the achievements of an individual who demonstrates a history of leadership and excellence a pioneer or advocate at the forefront of the response to HIV and AIDS. The award highlights an individual’s contribution that results in increased knowledge, skills, creative solutions or evidence-based policies and programmes to enhance the global response to HIV.

The IAS President’s Award is a recognition award with no monetary value. The prize consists of a statue and a certificate setting forth the reasons for the award.

To be eligible for the award, the individual must meet the following criteria:

  • The individual must be nominated by two or more members of the International AIDS Society Governing Council from at least two regions;
  • The nominee demonstrates a long history of leadership and excellence as a pioneer at the forefront of the response to HIV and AIDS;
  • The nominee demonstrates throughout their career that they act as a strong advocate for implementation of effective, evidence-based policies and programmes that enhance the global response to AIDS.

Previous prize winners

See the list of winners from previous years.

AIDS 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, USA, for his leadership at the forefront of the HIV response.

AIDS 2014
Dr. Eric Goosby, USA, in recognition of his long-term commitment, leadership and experience working in the HIV filed at local, national and global levels.

AIDS 2012
Dr Michel Kazatchkine, France, for his impact on the epidemic and his contribution to expand access to antiretroviral treatment.

AIDS 2010
Dr Jack Whitescarver, USA, for his outstanding commitment to the global fight against HIV and his pioneering work in the field.

IAS/MSD Prize for Operational and Implementation Research in Differentiated Service Delivery – Annual prize

The International AIDS Society and Merck Sharpe & Dohme (MSD) award a co-partnered prize for the top-scoring abstracts in operational and implementation research in differentiated service delivery. The prize recognizes outstanding research that addresses key knowledge gaps and links new evidence to strategic programme priorities in differentiated service delivery. The prize (US$10,000 per recipient) is awarded to the four highest-scoring abstracts. It is funded by MSD.

Eligible candidates are presenting authors of regular and late-breaker abstracts submitted to AIDS 2020, who meet the following criteria:

  • The abstract has been accepted as an oral presentation, for a poster discussion session or for the poster exhibition.
  • The research demonstrates innovation, originality, rationale and quality.
  • The abstract presents data on differentiated service delivery for HIV.

Abstract submitters do not need to apply for the prize. All abstracts that meet the criteria will be automatically considered.

Previous prize winners

 See the list of winners from previous years.

IAS 2019

Jennifer Zech, United States, “Optimizing treatment models for people living with HIV in urban Zimbabwe: Findings from a mixed methods study”

Vivian Chitiyo, Zimbabwe, “Differentiated antiretroviral therapy delivery: A review of implementation progress and challenges in Zimbabwe”

Didier Kamerhe, Democratic Republic of the Congo, “Improved HIV treatment retention among patients enrolled in a differentiated care model at Kenya General Reference Hospital in Haut Katanga province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo”

Bruce Agins, United States, “Improving rapid ART initiation in Blantyre, Malawi, through implementation of a quality improvement collaborative”

Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award – Biennial award

The Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award recognizes the efforts of individuals who have achieved major breakthroughs or shown exceptional courage in their efforts to advocate for human rights in the field of HIV. The award is supported by the International AIDS Society and the Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) to pay a lasting tribute to Dame Elizabeth Taylor, who has been a highly visible, vocal, and relentless champion of human rights in the HIV field.

From the early days of the AIDS epidemic until her passing in March 2011, Dame Elizabeth Taylor, amfAR’s Founding International Chairman, was one of the strongest advocates for the respect of human rights of all people living with or affected by HIV.

The Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award, which is awarded every two years at the International AIDS Society-convened International AIDS Conferences, came into effect in 2012 and was awarded for the first time at the opening ceremony of the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012). The Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award is a recognition award, with no monetary value. The prize consists of a statue and a certificate setting forth the reasons for the award.

Previous prize winners

See the list of winners from previous years.

AIDS 2018
Allan Achesa Maleche, Kenya, executive director of the Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV and AIDS (KELIN). Maleche and his colleagues have litigated landmark cases protecting the rights of people affected by HIV and tuberculosis.

AIDS 2016
Martha Tholanah, Zimbabwe, in recognition of her outstanding efforts to advocate for Human Rights inthe field of HIV.

AIDS 2014
Paul Semugoma, Uganda, in recognition of his outstanding efforts to advocate for Human Rights in the field of HIV.

AIDS 2012
Arash and Kamiar Alaei, Iran, in recognition of their efforts to advocate for Human Rights in the field of HIV.

IAS/ANRS Dominique Dormont Prize – Annual prize

The US$5,000 IAS/ANRS Dominique Dormont Prize is funded by the Dominique Dormont Association. The prize supports young researchers working on chronic conditions in humans, with a particular focus on the interface between HIV and other chronic diseases. It highlights researchers who demonstrate originality, rationale, quality and a multidisciplinary and integrative approach in the field of HIV and AIDS research.

Eligible candidates are presenting authors of abstracts submitted to AIDS 2020, which meet the following criteria:

  • The abstract has been accepted as an oral presentation.
  • The research demonstrates originality, rationale, quality and multidisciplinary and integrative approach in the field of HIV and AIDS research.
  • The presenting author is under 40 years of age.

Previous prize winners

See the list of winners from previous years.

IAS 2019
Shalena Naidoo, South Africa “Persistence of myeloid cell-associated inflammation in HIV-infected children after 8 years on early initiated therapy – the key role players in HIV persistence?”

AIDS 2018
Stéphane Isnard, Canada “Relevance of Reg3α and I-FABP on microbial translocation, inflammation and reservoir size in people living with HIV”

IAS 2017
Maria Salgado, Spain “Achievement of Full Donor Chimerism with Episodes of Alloreactivity Contributes to Reduce the HIV Reservoir after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.”

Prize for Excellence in HIV Research Related to Children – Biennial prize

There is an urgent need to advance the scientific understanding of paediatric HIV and the psychosocial impact of the epidemic on children in order to enhance practices of prevention, treatment and care. With the aim of drawing the attention of the scientific community to children living with and affected by HIV and AIDS, the IAS/CCABA Prize for Excellence in HIV Research Related to Children was first awarded at the XVIII International AIDS Conference in Vienna, Austria, in 2010.

The US$2,000 prize is jointly offered by the International AIDS Society and the Coalition for Children Affected by AIDS (CCABA). One prize is awarded to an investigator whose abstract demonstrates excellence in research that is likely to lead to improved services for children affected by HIV and AIDS.

Eligible candidates are presenting authors of abstracts submitted to AIDS 2020, which meet the following criteria:

  • The abstract must have been accepted as an oral presentation, poster discussion or poster exhibition.
  • Research must be related to the needs of children affected by HIV (using the UNICEF definition of a child aged 0-18 years). Research focusing on the integration of care and support is encouraged, especially highlighting the impact of holistic approaches.
  • The research site must include low- or middle-income countries .

Previous prize winners

See the list of winners from previous years.

AIDS 2018
RamadhaniAbdul, Tanzania, “Child labour in Tanzanian small-scale gold mines: high HIV and violence risk”Claire Davies, South Africa, “Cohort study of HIV+ children in Southern Africa returning to care after being lost to follow up: effect of interrupting care on mortality”

AIDS 2016
Makhahliso Jubilee, Lesotho, for the abstract, ‘Index Tracking model as a strategy in finding children and adolescents, and improving effective referrals’ Theresa Betancourt, United States, for the abstract, ‘Family-based promotion of mental health in children affected by HIV: a pilot randomized controlled trial’

AIDS 2014
Louise Kuhn, USA, for the abstract, “HIV antibody detection in children who started antiretroviral treatment in infancy”.

AIDS 2012
Gabriel Anabwani, Botswana, for the abstract, “The psychosocial impact of HIV on the siblings of infected children”.

AIDS 2010
Priscilla Akwara, USA, for her abstract, “Who is the vulnerable child? Using survey data to identify children at risk in the era of HIV and AIDS”.

Women, Girls and HIV Investigator’s Prize – Biennial prize

This US$2,000 prize is funded by the International AIDS Society and UNAIDS, with the support of the International Community of Women with HIV/AIDS. The vulnerability of women and girls to HIV infection and accelerated disease progression is well documented. As HIV incidence continues to increase among women and girls, particularly in resource-limited settings, research on gender-related issues, including community-based interventions and investigations, will provide critical evidence and information on to inform our response.

The Women, Girls and HIV Investigator’s Prize was introduced in 2008 to support young female investigators from resource-limited settings whose abstracts demonstrate excellence in research and/or practices that address women, girls and gender issues related to HIV and AIDS. Since AIDS 2010, partners have agreed to change eligibility to allow any researcher (male or female, regardless of age) to receive the award as long as the criteria are met. The purpose of the Women, Girls and HIV Investigator’s Prize is to encourage research in low- and middle-income countries that can benefit women and girls affected by HIV and AIDS.

Eligible candidates are presenting authors of abstracts submitted to AIDS 2020, which meet the following criteria:

  • The Scientific Programme Committee has accepted the abstract as an oral presentation, for a poster discussion session or for the poster exhibition.
  • The abstract demonstrates excellence in research and/or practice that addresses women, girls and gender issues related to HIV and AIDS.
  • The abstract title contains at least one of the following keywords: “women”, “girls”, “gender”.
  • The presenting author is a national of a low- or middle-income country .
  • The investigation has taken place in a low- or middle-income country .

Previous prize winners

See the list of winners from previous years.

AIDS 2018
Zachary Kwena, Kenya, “Barriers to linkage and retention in HIV care among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in communities around Lake Victoria in Western Kenya”

IAS 2017
Brendan Maughan-Brown, South Africa “HIV and HSV-2 risk among young women in age-disparate partnerships: evidence from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa”

AIDS 2016
Sinaye Ngcapu, South Africa, for the abstract, ‘Effect of injectable hormonal contraceptives on vaginal epithelium thickness and genital HIV target cell density in women recently infected with HIV’.

IAS 2015
Jean Wysler Domercant, Haiti, for the abstract, “Attrition from antiretroviral treatment services among pregnant and non-pregnant patients following adoption of Option B+ in Haiti”.

AIDS 2014
Xu-Dong Zhang, China, for the abstract “Sexual and reproductive health in adolescent female sex workers: Kunming, China”.

IAS 2013
Definate Nhamo, Zimbabwe, for the abstract “Factors associated with gender-based violence and unintended pregnancy among adolescent women living with HIV in Zimbabwe”.

AIDS 2012
Peter Mudiope, Uganda, for the abstract “Partnership of HIV infected mothers (peers), community lay women/men (Sengas/Kojas) and village health teams (VHTs) with prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programs, increased male partner support for HIV infected women in one rural health centre and three urban hospitals in Uganda, July 2009 – July 2011”.

IAS 2011
Milly Kaggwa Nanyombi, Uganda, for her abstract “Preventing HIV Infection among adolescents by addressing Cross Generational Sex (CGS) in Secondary Schools in Uganda”.

AIDS 2010
Naina Rani Mangalore, India, for her abstract “Mainstreaming the Prevention of Parent to Child Transmission (PPTCT) Program with the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM): Experiences from Southern India”.

IAS 2009
Linnet N. Masese, Kenya, for her abstract “A prospective cohort study of the effect of antiretroviral therapy on sexual risk behaviour in a high-risk cohort of Kenyan women.”

AIDS 2008
Paola E. Pérez Maldonado, Mexico, for her abstract “The Condomovila: taking HIV information and prevention to the most vulnerable Mexican women”.

AIDS 2006
Penelope Campbell from Jamaica, for her abstract “Baseline study informs establishment of a mobile unit providing HIV/AIDS/STI information, skills and services to vulnerable adolescents”.

Prudence Mabele Prize – Biennial prize

The Prudence Mabele Prize is an endowment named in honour of the life and work of Prudence Mabele, a trailblazing activist for the rights of women and people living with HIV. In 1992, she became the first black woman to publicly reveal her HIV-positive status in South Africa, and she was a founding member of the Treatment Action Campaign and founder of the Positive Women’s Network.

The International AIDS Society created the prize in 2018 through an endowment from the Ford Foundation and the Open Society Foundations, and in partnership with the Positive Women’s Network of South Africa. The prize carries the largest monetary value awarded at the International AIDS Conference.

The selected honouree will be a woman (cis or trans) whose work and personal commitment best embodies the values, spirit and activism of Prudence Mabele. They will be publicly honoured at a high-level session at the International AIDS Conference.

In 2018, the Prudence Mabele Prize was awarded to Duduzile (Dudu) Dlamini at the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Read more about Dudu and her achievements in the media release.

Consideration will be based on the following criteria:

  • Nominations are invited for women (cis and trans) making deep connections between the fight against HIV, feminism and gender and reproductive justice.
  • Potential recipients should match the values that Prudence embodied:
    • Innovativeness: Demonstrate the creativity of the nominee in their work, in line with the innovation Prudence showed throughout her life.
    • Perseverance: Illustrate the tenacity of the nominee in achieving their accomplishments.
    • Social justice: Exemplify how the nominee enhances social justice in both their work and personal life, with an emphasis on gender activism and vulnerable people.
  • We encourage applications from around the world. Strong consideration will be given to applicants from the region where the conference is hosted. To honour and commemorate Prudence’s early activism and the courage she showed as a young women openly speaking about her HIV-positive status, preference will also be given to applications from young people (under the age of 35, according to the definition in the African Youth Charter).

Timeline

  • 17 March: Submissions open
  • 31 March: Submissions close
  • 27 April: Deadline for nomination reviews
  • 30 April: Winner notified

Robert Carr Research Award – Biennial award

The Robert Carr Research Award recognizes a research project conducted by a community-academia partnership that has led to evidence-based programmes and/or influenced policies in the field of HIV to guide a human rights-based response. The Robert Carr Research Award is a joint initiative of the International AIDS Society (IAS), the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO), Caribbean Vulnerable Communities (CVC) and the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health and Human Rights (CPHHR). The award is sponsored by the IAS, ICASO and the Open Society Foundations (OSF).

Dr Robert Carr was the Executive Director of the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition, the Policy and Advocacy Director of ICASO and a human rights activist who highlighted stigma and discrimination against people living with or affected by HIV and AIDS. His commitment to translating findings from research collaborations between community and academic partners into advocacy efforts, evidence-based programmes and tangible policy is the driving force behind this prize.

To be eligible for the award, the research project must meet the following criteria:

  • The research project has been nominated by an IAS Governing Council member, an ICASO Board of Directors member, an HRW Health and Human Rights Division’s Advisory Committee member or a CPHHR Advisory Board member.
  • The research project has been conducted by a community-academia partnership in which all partners were equally involved in designing the study, collecting and analysing the data and disseminating the results.
  • The research project has led to evidence-based programmes and/or influenced policies in the field of HIV to guide a human rights-based response to HIV.
  • For the 2020 award, preference will be given to projects that address issues of race and/or migration and HIV.

For more information, or to submit a nomination for the Robert Carr Award, please visit ICASO’s website here.